Tweeter button
Facebook button

play slot games online at Slots Dad

*NEWS

The following speech was delivered by the City’s Executive Mayor, Patricia de Lille, at the full Council meeting today, 27 July 2017.

Mr Speaker, may we have a moment of silence for the councillors who passed away: Templeton Mgxekeni, Xolile Gwangxu, Mandisa Menisi, anti-apartheid activist and government spokesperson, Ronnie Mamoepa, jazz legends Errol Dyers and Ray Phiri, and the fire victims.

Thank you.

Good morning, goeie dag, molweni, as-salaam alaikum, shalom.

I would like to welcome all councillors back from the mid-year recess. I trust that we are ready to continue taking service delivery to the next level.

Let me start with the drought crisis and yes, despite the recent rains, we are still in a drought. By now this should not be news to anyone and we certainly cannot go back to business as usual or acting under the assumption that we will get sufficient rain. Continue reading

Today marked a momentous occasion, when approximately 5 000 beneficiaries living in Wallacedene, Wesbank, Mfuleni and Kalkfontein had the opportunity to receive their title deeds for the first time. 

The City of Cape Town is ready to issue 5 000 title deeds to beneficiaries living in Wallacedene, Wesbank, Mfuleni and Kalkfontein, which is testament to our commitment to empowering some of our most vulnerable residents as rightful property owners.

Over the past six years, the City has handed over thousands of title deeds to residents to ensure that they are confirmed as rightful property owners.

To date, nearly 4 000 beneficiaries in Wallacedene, Wesbank, Mfuleni and Kalkfontein have already received their title deeds. In addition, approximately 8 000 title deeds are in the process of being transferred to beneficiaries.

The City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Area North, Councillor Suzette Little, and the Mayoral Committee Member for Area East, Councillor Anda Ntsodo, handed over the title deeds to the beneficiaries today, 26 July 2017. Continue reading

Twelve of the City of Cape Town’s libraries have undergone upgrades in the last six months of the financial year, and several more are due for maintenance and renovation in the next few months. While this necessitates the closure of these libraries as work gets under way, the results are creative spaces that inspire and encourage learning. Read more below:

A number of City libraries are due for mini-makeovers in the next year as part of the Library and Information Services Department’s renovations and maintenance programme.

During the past six months, 12 of the City’s libraries have been closed to allow for essential upgrades and renovation. The 12 libraries that have been completed are Delft South, Tokai, Masakhane, Moses Mabhida, Mfuleni, Kloof Street, Blouberg Strand, Tafelsig, Gugulethu, Bishop Lavis, Southfield and Eikendal.

The latest library to reopen after a near R4 million upgrade was the Eikendal Library. The library space was doubled; electrical wiring, telephones, an alarm system, and IT networks were upgraded; floor and roof coverings were replaced; and the building was given a fresh coat of paint. Ablution facilities were also upgraded, with the addition of toilets for people with disabilities.

‘The upgrade of Eikendal Library was in direct response to the popularity of this library and the immense demand for library services in this community. The City’s goal is to provide world-class facilities to all our communities and it starts with maintaining the ones we have. Libraries offer a space where people can keep their minds active. The fact that any person – young or old, rich or poor, employed or unemployed – can walk into a library and find information to educate and enrich themselves makes these facilities an essential part of community life,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security; and Social Services, Alderman JP Smith. Continue reading

WARNING TO ALL WATER USERS IN CAPE TOWN

The City of Cape Town warns all of its water users that failure to reduce consumption spells disaster for everyone. Water usage has shot up to 643 million litres per day. This is 143 million litres above our target of 500 million litres of collective water use per day. Read more below:

Our latest consumption levels are extremely worrying as many people believe that they can go back to normal behaviour due to recent rains. These recent rains are not nearly enough as we are still in a drought crisis. The drought conditions are the New Normal for Cape Town as a water-scarce region. To adapt to the New Normal, we have to change our behaviour drastically to save water while we still have water to be saved.

Too many people are not listening to the City’s warnings and appeals to reduce their consumption. The rainfall has made a very small impact on our dam levels. The fact that we are still 143 million litres over our 500 million litre target per day means that those who are not reducing consumption are playing with everyone’s future in Cape Town.

The lower than average rainfall, coupled with unacceptably high consumption, will hurt us all as there are still far too many stubborn people who are not doing enough to save water so that we can build up of reserves for a terribly harsh 2017/18 summer. Continue reading

Several motorists got a rude awakening during early morning random breath testing stops by the City’s Traffic Service. Read more below:

City of Cape Town traffic officers netted eight motorists for drunk driving in Muizenberg, Fish Hoek and Simon’s Town early yesterday morning, 23 July 2017.

The arrests formed part of the random breath testing project currently under way. One of those arrested had a reading of 0,64 mg of alcohol per 100 ml of blood, which is nearly three times the legal limit.

‘I need to impress upon members of the public that the effects of the night before linger far longer than many might imagine. If you’ve had a hard night of drinking, rather steer clear of driving for a while longer to avoid the situation that these motorists were caught in. In the morning, some drivers are still affected by the significant alcohol consumed the night before. It is also worth noting that roadblocks are no longer middle-of-the-night occurrences, but happen around the clock and you can be caught at any time. So, if you’ve been drinking, don’t drive for at least 12 to 24 hours afterwards,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security; and Social Services, Alderman JP Smith. Continue reading

This from timeslive.co.za:

New evidence links Eskom chief financial officer Anoj Singh directly to payments of hundreds of millions of rands to a Gupta-linked firm the power utility denied knowing about.

The Times has also unearthed evidence of a number of trips by Singh to Dubai on the Guptas’ tab at the time of major deals between Gupta entities and parastatals he worked for.

Eskom last week finally admitted to paying R495-million to Trillian Capital Partners, owned by key Gupta lieutenant Salim Essa.

Eskom’s top executives – including Singh – claimed their previous denials had been because of confusion about Trillian’s relationship with the power utility.

But The Times has obtained new evidence from a whistleblower that shows Singh had direct knowledge of the Trillian payments as far back as February 2016 – nearly two months before the first payment of R30.6-million.

E-mails show that Singh was sent the first Trillian invoice, itemised for “Eskom corporate plan deliverable”, on February 11 2016.

Full story here:

https://www.timeslive.co.za/politics/2017-07-24-eskoms-singh-linked-to-gupta-deals-worth-billions/

On the 22nd two groups of community leaders in Imizamo Yethu met to negotiate a peace deal to restore calm in the area so that the City of Cape Town’s super-blocking project could proceed.

The two groups include a small group of community leaders who were against the super-blocking and the majority of the leaders who are in support of the project and who have been working with the City to ensure that the project can progress.

The two groups of leaders met along with City political leaders, City officials, and senior members of the South African Police Service at the Hout Bay Fire Station.

The two community leader groups came to an agreement in which the one group was updated about the super-blocking project and they agreed to engage the community at large to put an end to the violence so that the project can continue. Continue reading

Over 200 staff members from the City’s Disaster Risk Management, Fire and Rescue Services, Law Enforcement, Traffic Services and Metro Police Departments have all been in the City’s employ for between 20 and 45 years. Today they were acknowledged for their extensive contribution. Read more below:

The City of Cape Town’s Safety and Security Directorate today paid tribute to more than 200 staff members who have all reached long service milestones. The 212 officers and staff who were given long-service awards today have between them given 5 481 years of service.

The staff members from the City’s enforcement and rescue services have been in the City’s employ for between 20 and 45 years – the bulk of them employed by the Fire and Rescue Service, Law Enforcement, Traffic and Coordination Services. A full list of recipients is available here. Continue reading

Ashwell Prince pic on Instagram

Ashwell Prince pic on Instagram

This from iol.co.za:

The dreaded “T” word in sport has reared its ugly head again.Transformation is back in focus after former Proteas cricketer Graeme Pollock said that the national team will have to accept being a “middle-of-the-road” Test side if they stuck with racial quotas.

His comments, which followed South Africa’s defeat against England at Lord’s two weeks ago, drew widespread criticism.

Pollock backtracked yesterday, with a spokesperson releasing a statement saying his comments were “misconstrued”.

“Speaking from London, Graeme Pollock wishes to convey his heartiest congratulations to Faf (du Plessis) and his team for their excellent Test victory at Trent Bridge. With the series now level at 1-all, this sets up the series for a fascinating outcome,” said spokesperson Basil O’Hagan.

“Graeme also extends his sincerest apologies to CSA Board and the South African cricketing public for the manner in which his comments at a recent function in London were totally misconstrued.

“Graeme fully supports the endeavours of the transformation process as further evidenced in the radio interview he had on July 6 with Jonathan Agnew of BBC’s TMS broadcast.”

Ashwell Prince, a former Proteas captain and batsman, and current Cape Cobras coach, said, Pollock’s comments were “most disappointing”.

“They (Pollock’s comments) most definitely struck a nerve. Not just with myself, but it seems the overwhelming majority of South Africans,” Prince said.

“Quite frankly, as a former Protea, one has reached the point where you simply just cannot sit back and allow people with these kind of mindsets to keep feeding the world this kind of rubbish and just let it be.”

In August, former Proteas batsman, Daryll Cullinan, caused controversy after he told ESPN: “My issue around that (transformation in cricket) is, it’s inherently not a black man’s game in the country.”

Prince continued: “Some people and certain media in this country with similar backward mindsets feel its their duty to tell the world that non-white people, people whom they have never met, sometimes never seen play, and know absolutely nothing about, have nothing good to offer our national teams, simply because they’re not white.

Full story here:

http://www.iol.co.za/weekend-argus/prince-fed-up-with-rubbish-about-transformation-10415065

The City of Cape Town received more than 100 submissions as part of its Request for Information/Ideas (RFI) process to test the market for proposed solutions that will enable the City to temporarily establish several small, intermediate and possibly even large plants to help supply drinking water. Read more below:

The City thanks all of the private sector players who took part in this process. The RFI solicited interest from for-profit and non-profit entities in forming possible partnerships with the City to supply, install, and operate temporary plants at various locations along the sea shore and at certain inland locations, for the injection of drinking water – the standards of which are defined by SANS 241 of 2015 – into the City’s water distribution network.

‘Our Water and Sanitation Management Department is currently busy with the technical scrutiny of the inputs received. We will communicate in more detail as soon as possible. The proposed solutions are varied, as one would expect from a wide ranging call for information and ideas. It must be stressed that the temporary installation of water plants is intended to build resilience and to ensure that the households and businesses of Cape Town are not adversely affected by acute shortages of surface water.

‘Furthermore, it is important to distinguish between the inability to cater for water demand under normal climatic conditions and the inability to cater for demand due to an extreme and protracted drought. The latter applies to us. The intensity of the current severe drought could not have been foreseen. The City has been using water well under its registered allocation as per the requirements of the National Department of Water and Sanitation. Despite our population growth, our water demand has remained relatively flat,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Informal Settlements, Water and Waste Services; and Energy, Councillor Xanthea Limberg. Continue reading

News
baydu.co.za RUNNER UP in TWO categories! Lifestyle and Entertainment!
View My Stats